7. Don’t forget to keep things hot

7. Don’t forget to keep things hot

“Sex isn’t just about orgasms. It’s about sensation, emotional intimacy, stress relief, improved health (improved immune and cardiovascular system), and increased emotional bonding with your partner, thanks to the wonderful release of hormones due to physical touch. There are many more reasons to have sex than just getting off.”

“Many times people become increasingly shy with the person they love the more as time goes by. Partners begin to take their love for granted and forget to keep themselves turned on and to continue to seduce their partner.

Keep your ‘sex esteem‘ alive by keeping up certain practices on a regular basis. This allows you to remain vibrant, sexy, and engaged in your love life.”

8. Remove the pressure on performance

“The penis-vagina model of sex comes with pressures, such as having an orgasm at the same time or the idea that an orgasm should happen with penetration. With these strict expectations come a pressure on performance that ultimately leads many to feel a sense of failure and frustration.

Instead, try to expand your concept of www.besthookupwebsites.org/nl/chatstep-overzicht/ sex to include anything that involves close, intimate connection with your partner, such as sensual massages, taking a nice shower or bath together, reading an erotic story together, playing with some fun toys… the possibilities are endless.

And if orgasm happens, great, and if not, that’s OK too. When you expand your definition of sex and lower the pressure on orgasm and penetration, the anxiety around performance dissipates and your satisfaction can escalate.”

9. It’s not what you fight about – it’s how you fight

“Researchers have found that four conflict messages are able to predict whether couples remain together or get divorced: contempt, criticism, stonewalling (or withdrawal), and defensiveness.

Together, they’re known as ‘The Four Horsemen.‘ Instead of resorting to these negative tactics, fight fairly: Look for places where each partner’s goal overlaps into a shared common goal and build from that. Also, focus on using ‘I‘ versus ‘you‘ language.”

10. Try a nicer approach

“Research has shown that the way a problem is brought up determines both how the rest of that conversation will go and how the rest of the relationship will go. Many times an issue is brought up by attacking or blaming one’s partner, also known as criticism, and one of the killers of a relationship.

So start gently. Instead of saying, ‘You always leave your dishes all over the place! Why can’t you pick anything up?‘ try a more gentle approach, focusing on your own emotional reaction and a positive request.

For example: ‘I get annoyed when I see dishes in the living room. Would you please put them back in the kitchen when you’re finished?’”

11. Identify your “good conflicts”

“Every couple has what I call a ‘good conflict.‘ In long-term relationships, we often feel that the thing you most need from your partner is the very thing he or she is least capable of giving you. This isn’t the end of love – it’s the beginning of deeper love! Don’t run from that conflict.

It’s supposed to be there. In fact, it’s your key to happiness as a couple – if you both can name it and commit to working on it together as a couple. If you approach your ‘good conflicts‘ with bitterness, blame, and contempt, your relationship will turn toxic.”

12. Take time apart

“A friend taught me that no matter how in love you are or how long you’ve been together, it’s important to take an exhale from your partnership.

Hang out with girlfriends until late in the evening, take a weekend trip to visit family, or just spend time ‘doing you‘ for a while. Then when you go home to Yours Truly, you’ll both be recharged and ready to come together even stronger.”

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